Tag Archives: Archaeological Site

Palamidi, Nafplio

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Fortress of Palamidi was built on a hill overlooking the town of Nafplio.

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

The construction was conducted between 1711 and 1715, started by the Venetian Governor Agostino Sagredo with La Salle (or Lasalle) as architect using the design made by Antonio Giancix, but fell to the Ottomans in 1715 before or shortly after the completion.

To reach the entrance to the site, there are 2 options. One is to climb 800 and more steps from the bottom and the other is to climb with a car up to the car park in front of the Bastion of Epameinondas. In 2014, ticket costs 4 Euro.

Bastion of Epameinondas and Car park

Bastion of Epameinondas and Car park

The stairs that are now used by the visitors are constructed in the era of King Othon. The original covered staircase is preserved, but not accessible to the visitors.

Stairs of Palamidi

Stairs of Palamidi

The fortress is a huge construction with 8 bastions. If you are not sure to visit only the Bastion of St. Andreas (San Girardo), you’d better count at least 1 hour to wander around the site.

Aerial Photo of the Site

Aerial Photo of the Site (taken from the information board in the site).

Theodoros Kolokotroni was once incarcerated here. It is now one of the best attractions of the fortress.

Kolokotroni's Prison

Kolokotroni’s Prison. The hole in the left bottom is the entrance.

Kolokotroni's Prison

Kolokotroni’s Prison: the cell seen from the entrance.

Reference

  • Robin Barber, Greece (Blue Guide), London- N.Y. 2001 (Revised reprint of the 6th edition of 1995), pp. 236-237.
  • Pamphlet “The Fortress of Palamidi”, Archaeological Receipts Fund 2012.
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Some more photos from the Fortress.

View of Nafplio from Palamidi

View of Nafplio from Palamidi

Bastion of St. Andreas, Palamidi

Bastion of St. Andreas, Palamidi

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

Palamidi, Nafplio

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Aigosthena (Porto Germeno)

Aigosthena (Porto Germeno) is a small resort facing the eastern Corinthian Gulf. There is an archaeological site dating back to the late Classic/ early Hellenistic and the Byzantine periods.

Fortress of Aigosthena

Fortress of Aigosthena

Aigosthena is scarcely documented in ancient literature. Consequently the datation of the fortification should be based on the architectural style and the historical background. According to the information board on site, the most probable theory is that the Athenians and the Megarans constracted it in 343BC, when they made an alliance to prepare for the threat from the Thebans.

Towenr, Fortress of Aigosthena

Towenr, Fortress of Aigosthena

The acropolis was on the hilltop and the fortification wall is best preserved there. The wall actually continues to the sea so that also the port can be protected by it.

The tower of the south corner of the acropolis (in the photo below) is the best preserved.

Tower, Fortification of Aigosthena

Tower, Fortification of Aigosthena

The same tower from close. Built in square plan of 8.8 x 8.8 meters and about 18 m high.

Tower, Fortress of Aigosthena

Tower, Fortress of Aigosthena

A back gate of the eastern part of the Acropolis fortification.

Back Gate of the Fortification, Aigosthena

Back Gate of the Fortification, Aigosthena

It must have been used to make sortie as well.

An extension of the wall reaching to the sea.

Fortification wall, Aigosthena

Fortification wall, Aigosthena

 

Reference

  • Christopher Mee & Antony Spawforth, Greece. An Oxford Archaeological Guide. Oxford/ OUP, 2001, p. 133-136.
  • Information Board in the site