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Nafplio and Around Index

Intex of Nafplio and Around

nafplio

 

Turkish Fountains in Nafplio

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The old town of Nafplio is adorned by some beautiful Turkish fountains. Here is a collection of their photographs.

Turkish Fountain

Turkish Fountain

This is the inscription in Arabic script used in the above fountain.

Inscription in Arabic characters

Inscription in Arabic characters

Another fountain furnished with reliefs as well as Arabic inscription.

Turkish Fountain

Turkish Fountain

Reliefs of the same fountain.

Relief

Relief

Yet another fountain with elaborate shape. Inscrption is engraved on the carved plate.

Turkish Fountain

Turkish Fountain

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Nafplio, Argolis

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Nafplio is a beautiful town on the Argolic Bay. It was the capital of the newly independent Greece from 1829 to 1834.

Syntagma Square, Nafplio

Syntagma Square, Nafplio

It preserves old and beautiful townscape and attracts many tourists, especially Greek from Athens, all through the year. It does not really have ‘off-season’ as other tourist attractions in Greece, so if you are planning to stay in Nafplio, do plan ahead even if it isn’t in summer, especially during the weekends.

Street of Nafplio

Street of Nafplio

 

Coach Timetable to and from Nafplio (English)
http://www.ktel-argolis.gr/en/profile.asp

It is alleged that the name Nafplio came from its legendary founder Nauplios, son of Poseidon, but it is also possible that this obscure hero was invented to explain the city’s name.

Bourtzi

Bourtzi

Palamedes, descendant of Nauplios, participated in Trojan War, but killed by the fellow Greeks being suspected of treason. In ca. 625 BC Naulpion was defeated by Argos and its inhabitants mostly fled to Messenia. Later, Nauplion seems to have lost its importance and when Pausanias visited here in the 2nd century AD, it was in ruins.

Next time we hear about the town is in Medieval period, when it emerged as a trading post. In 1203, governor of Nafplio, Leo Sgouros, occupied Argos, Corinth and Larissa. In 1210, however, Nafplio was lost to Geoffrey de Villehardouin, and together with Argos, was given to Otho de la Roche. In 1388, Venice purchased Nafplio and the fortification of Bourdzi was completed under the Venetians (1470). In 1540, the Ottomans snatched Nafplio. In the next century Venetians recaptured it (1685/6), but never managed to man it enough and in 1715 it was lost again to the Turks.

At the outset of the War of Independence, it was one of the Turkish strongholds, but Theodoros Kolokotronis managed to gain it after a year’s siege. The provisory Greek government established itself in Nafplio and in 1829 Kapodistrias, the first prime minister, declared it as the capital of the newly independent Greece. He was assassinated inside the Church of St. Spyridon in Nafplio in 1831.

It remained to be the Greek capital under the king Otto until, in 1834, the government moved to Athens.

In the photo below is the fortress of Palamidi.

Palamidi

Palamidi

By the way, in Nafplio, there is arguably the best gelateria (Italian style ice cream parlor) in Greece called Antica Gelateria di Roma. Rather expensive, but anything is delicious thanks to the best quality ingredients.

Antica Gelateria di Roma

Antica Gelateria di Roma

It is conveniently located near the Syntagma Square. Address is as follows.

Antica Gelateria di Roma
Farmakopoulon 3 & Komninou, Nauplio
http://www.anticagelateria.gr/

Reference

  • Robin Barber, Greece (Blue Guide), London- N.Y. 2001 (Revised reprint of the 6th edition of 1995), pp. 232-236.
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Some more photos from Nafplio

Nafplio

Nafplio

Nafplio

Nafplio

Nafplio

Nafplio

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Island of Evia – Euboea

Evia is the 2nd largest island of Greece, after Crete and one of the two islands connected to the mainland Greece, together with Lefkada.

It takes only 1 hour or less of drive from Athens to its gateway town Halkida (ancient Chalkis).

North Evia

Edipso
Agios Giorgios

Central Evia

Halkida
Saint John the Russian (village of Prokopi)

South Evia

Holy John the Russian, Evia

The church of Agios Ioannis Rossos (Saint John the Russian) is situated in the village of Prokopi, in central Evia.

Agios Ioannis Rossos

Church of Agios Ioannis Rossos (Saint John the Russian)

It attracts many visitors not only from all over the Greece, but also from other Orthodox countries like Russia, Roumania, and Bulgaria.

John was said to be born around 1690 in Russia. He was conscripted to the Russian army under Peter the First. In 1711, during the Russo-Turkish war, he and other soldiers were held captive by a Turkish commander, who took them to Prokopio in Asia Minor.
The Turkish commander tried to convert them into Islam, but John persisted in Christian faith, while serving his Muslim master.
He died around 1730. His remains were but his remains continued to perform miracles.
Following the Lausanne Convention of 1923 that decided the population exchange between Turkey and Greece, the Christian inhabitants of Prokopion moved to Evia and there founded the village of Prokopi, bringing the remains of Saint John with them.
The remains were first deposited at the Church of Saints Constantine and Helen and in 1951 were moved to a new church dedicated to him.
His feast is held in 27 May.

From Athens to Prokopi, the distance is about 130 KM and it takes 2 hour drive, going through Athens-Lamia National Road and the ramification toward Halkida. The drive from Halkida to Prokopi is quite pleasant passing through mountains and forests.

One of the tourist shops

Saint John mugs at one of the tourist shops

In Prokopi, religious tourist proliferates. There are many tourist oriented shops, cafeterias and some tavernas. You can leave your car at the car park at the entrance of village, but there are places where you can park around the Church.

Inside the Church

Inside the Church. On the left side is where the remains of Saint John are deposited.

Outside the church, there are places where you can collect holy water and holy oil. There is also a small oratory where deposited a belt and a cap with holy benediction; you can wear these and pray to the Saint.

Reference